Rosettes – Old World Scandinavian Treat or Funnel Cakes?

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When we were kids, my mom would let us make Rosettes about once a winter during a long, cold, football-filled Sunday. They are pretty messy, very delicious, and a family tradition. The magazine that my mom saved this recipe out of says that they are likely to be “the new versatile sweet of the 70’s!” I think we can call this recipe “vintage.” I love that I still have the original, oil-splattered magazine pages. 

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My kids think they taste like mini-funnel cakes, covered in powdered sugar. They like to make them for no reason at all, but I rarely okay this as it seems like a waste of oil and requires lots of supervision. Still, I am glad to be passing on another family tradition! And it is fun to give the rosette irons as a gift with copies of this vintage recipe!

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Rosettes and Other Tremendous Timbales We Have Known

Makes 3 dozen 

2 eggs, slightly beaten

2 teaspoons granulated sugar

1 cup milk

1 cup all-purpose flour (if using self-rising flour, omit salt.)

1/4 teaspoon salt

Confectioners’ sugar or sugar and cinnamon

1. Mix eggs, granulated sugar and milk. Stir in flour and salt, beating until smooth. Batter will be about the consistency of heavy cream.

2. Heat oil to 400 degrees in deep saucepan or electric skillet (I use a small, heavy pot that I don’t mind ruining.) Heat iron in hot oil; drain excess oil on paper toweling. Dip heated iron into batter until mold is 2/3 covered. 

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3. Dip coated iron quickly into hot oil, cooking until golden brown, about 1 minute. Remove rosette from iron (a fork helps if stuck a bit). If rosette is not crisp, batter is too thick and should be diluted with milk. Dip rosettes in confectioners’ sugar while still warm. 

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Yum! 

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